Pupil Premium Information  2016-17

 

The government provide additional funds to all maintained schools under the Pupil Premium grant. All schools are required by the Department for Education to publish the amount of money they receive and detail how they intend to use this allocation over the current academic year. They also have to give details regarding how the previous year’s allocation was spent and the impact this had on raising standards at the school.

 

The Pupil Premium for 2016-17 will include:

 

•             Children who on the January 2015 School Census are known to have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) in any of the previous six years, as well as those first known to be eligible at January 2017. 

•             Children adopted from care.

•             Children of armed services personnel.

                                  

The fund is designed to support schools in ‘narrowing the attainment gap’ this is because traditionally children from more disadvantaged households tend to do significantly less well at school when measured by statutory examinations.  The allocation will be directly spent on raising standards of attainment and accelerating progress for all pupils who require additional support/ intervention in order to achieve the high educational targets we have set and achieve good progress or better, over the course of their time spent at school from their identified base lines. This includes the Pupil Premium group of pupils. 

 

We have facilitated an additional education programme for each child identified as requiring intervention. This has required significant additional staffing on top of our normal teaching compliment. We have employed several highly qualified and experienced teachers to deliver targeted ‘in-class’ small group interventions for reading, writing and maths and as well as small group and 1:1 support.  

 

Our Nurture team also work carefully to help alleviating problems outside school support so that children feel safe and able to access their education.  They also support children and families in improving punctuality and attendance.

 

Pupil Premium money has also been directed towards supporting an additional extra -curricular enrichment programme on top of the normal activities. The programme was designed to build self -esteem, confidence, health and fitness as well as support emotional well -being. All FSM children have been entitled to breakfast and after school clubs free of charge and well as many educational visits, either at a greatly reduced cost or free of charge.  These have supported the academic work done in school. We have also invested in ICT to encourage independence and engagement in learning. There is a strong link between these enrichment programmes and pupil attitude, attainment and attendance, which all impacts positively on raising standards and narrowing the gap. 

 

Funding for 2016-17

 

Estimated Pupil Premium Funding:  £105,290

Number of children : 99

% of children entitled to Pupil Premium Funding : 48.7%

 

As well as continuing to invest in additional teaching support and enrichment activities, we also intend using the funding in the following ways:-

 

  • Continuing to employ a Play Therapist through Fortis Therapy, using a ‘family’ approach to support parents and work in partnership to alleviate problems and keep children engaged in their learning.
  • Ensuring that each class, each half term has the opportunity to go on trips and activities in order to provide life experiences linked to their learning.  These will be provided free of charge or at a greatly reduced cost.
  • Employing an Attendance specialist to improve punctuality and attendance.

 

 

Impact on Attainment

Evaluating the impact of social interventions addressed by the enrichment activities is always difficult, but is best measured by the improvement of happiness and wellbeing levels which then has an impact on:-

  • Engagement in learning and ultimately improvements in attainment and progress
  • Increase in self esteem
  • Improved attendance
  • Reduced time spent in the behavioural/time out provision

 

We are trying very hard to narrow the gap at Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary Voluntary Academy and believe the funding has had a positive effect on improving attainment and progress.

 

EYFS

  • In 2015-16 only 33% of PP children had a Good Level of Development.  This rose to 70% in 2016-17. Children improved by 20% in Reading and Shape, Space and Measure and by 37% in Writing and Number.
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally for GLD has narrowed from last year from a gap of 39% to just 2% (reduced by 37%)
  • This pattern has repeated with Reading where the gap was 30% but reduced to 10% last year (reduced by 20%)
  • The biggest gap reduction was in writing where the gap was 42% and this has reduced to just 5% (reduced by 37%)
  • The gap in Number also reduced by 37% from 48% to 11% and by 20% in SSM, from 34% to 14%
  • The biggest improvement therefore was in writing and number and the focus for 2017-18 will need to be on reading and SSM.
  • Pupil premium children outperformed other children and were a strength.

 

 

Phonics Year 1

  • In 2015-16 only 50% of PP children achieved the expected standard in Phonics.  This rose to 75% in 2016-17 an increase of 25% and the average mark increased from 25 to 31, a rise of 4 marks.
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in phonics in y1 has narrowed from last year from a gap of 33% to just 8% (reduced by 25%)
  • The gap in average mark between PP children and non PP children nationally has reduced from 10 marks to 4 marks (reduced by an average of 6 marks).
  • In year 2, 100% of PP children have achieved the expected standard both in 2016-17 and the previous year in 2015-16.  Both of these are above the number of children in Y2 who met the standard nationally (93%).
  • The gap between PP children in school and non PP children nationally is the same as the gap other non PP children and other children nationally.  I.e. PP children are performing as well as other children in school.

 

KS1

  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in KS1 has not narrowed from last year.  This is down to the multiple vulnerabilities of this particular cohort.  54% of the PP children in this cohort have 3 vulnerabilities or more compared to 21% of non PP children.
  • Last year’s cohort were much weaker than the cohort from 2015-16 – they achieved a GLD of 43% compared to a GLD of 60 %.  This was a gap of 17%.
  • This gap of 17% remained in reading and maths but closed in writing.
  • This was not the same for non PP children who saw significant improvements in all subjects both at the expected standard and at greater depth. 

 

 

KS2

  • In 2015-16 only 21% of PP children achieved the expected standard in Reading at KS2.  This rose to 50% in 2016-17. Children improved by 29%.  In writing, PP children improved from 43% to 53%, a rise of 7% and in Maths, PP children improved from 21% to 50%, an improvement of 29%.
  • Progress from 2015-16 to 2016-17 improved in reading  by 2.07, by 0.29 in writing and by 0.83 in Maths.  Scaled scores increased by 6.5 in Reading and by 5.9 in maths.
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in reading at KS2 has narrowed from last year from a gap of 57% to 27% (reduced by 30%).  The gap at greater depth has reduced from 23% to 20% (reduced by 3%).
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in writing at KS2 has narrowed from last year from a gap of 36% to 31% (reduced by 5%).  The gap at greater depth has reduced from 18% to 4% (reduced by 14%).
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in maths at KS2 has narrowed from last year from a gap of 55% to 30% (reduced by 25%).  The gap at greater depth has reduced from 20% to 19% (reduced by 1%).
  • The gap between PP children and non PP children nationally reaching the expected standards in R/W/M combined at KS2 has narrowed from last year from a gap of 46% to 25% (reduced by 21%).  The gap at greater depth has widened from 7% to 11% (increased by 4%).
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